Growth spurt

In March, the labyrinth was looking great. We were eating greens and herbs from it daily, and spring flowers were beginning to bloom.

Two weeks of rainy weather, then sun, then travel, produced a dramatic burgeoning! By the time I got home from New York, the paths were overgrown, and all the greens had gone to seed.  

This time, I knew the cleanup was more than an hour’s project.

I hate to pull up plants that have gone to seed, even if I can give them to the chickens to eat. But really, I had missed my chance to replant greens when I should have, and didn’t want to wait and leave the labyrinth unnavigable while the seeds split and fell and germinated.

Two days later, and an infusion of compost from Richmond’s municipal compost giveaway, and the labyrinth was tamed and walkable.

 

 

 

I did leave some wildness spilling over the edges, and soon the wildness will creep back as it does every few weeks!

 

4 thoughts on “Growth spurt

  1. Vegetables turn bitter when they go to seed, and they get big and take a lot of space. One plant will usually provide you with all the seed you need if you want to use seed to propagate more. Once plants go to seed they usually turn brown and die, so have to be removed at that point anyway.So letting them go to seed, especially in a confined area like a labyrinth, just makes the space overcrowded without much benefit.

  2. I rather enjoy your spiral verdant world. Humming with what nature throws at it and of course your helping hand. It’s fun to grow things! One of my first memories of sheer delight was in a kindergarten class room. We brought waxy milk cartons from home, cut them down to a more usable height, filled them with dirt from the outskirts of the playground and then planted the seeds. Every day we watched and watched and then the miracle I had heard so much about in sermons at Sunday Mass, happened, pushing up and breaking the soil a new bright green life form! DELIGHT, I tell you, delight.

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